Category Archives: Literary References

Discovering Eleanor Tilney – Austen Foils Part III

Discovering Eleanor Tilney – Austen Foils Part III

“Northanger Abbey” was the first novel Jane Austen completed in 1803. However, it was not published until after her death in 1817. The main character is Catherine Moreland, a young girl from a small town. From association with her wealthy neighbors the Allen’s, she is invited to Bath to partake in the winter season. There,… more goodness …

Top 10 Goofs in Sense and Sensibility (2008)

Top 10 Goofs in Sense and Sensibility (2008)

This adaptation of Sense and Sensibility was screen-written by Andrew Davies and released on the BBC in the UK and under the Masterpiece Classic banner as a PBS series in the United States.  I have owned the DVD for many years, but it had been several years since I watched it prior to preparing for this… more goodness …

Twists and Turns Between First and Last Words

Twists and Turns Between First and Last Words

Every author engages in several practices and methods that are loosely gathered under the heading of “process.” Many of my friends are inveterate outliners. Others keep copious notes which end up on white boards or tacked to cork. Then there are those who carefully lay down their ideas in notebooks. I am no different…except for… more goodness …

Jane Austen and the Concept of Accepting a Marriage of Convenience

Jane Austen and the Concept of Accepting a Marriage of Convenience

What hope was there for the dowerless daughters of the middle class during Jane Austen’s lifetime? Such is a topic Austen explored repeatedly in her novels. Elizabeth and Jane Bennet sought men of a like mind, but their lack of fortune limited their exposure to such men. The Dashwood sisters found their choices limited by… more goodness …

The Foils of Jane Austen: Part II – Thomas Bertram

The Foils of Jane Austen: Part II – Thomas Bertram

When you remember the characters of Austen’s “Mansfield Park,” who do you think of first?  It’s kind of a no-brainer.  We all know the story is centered around Fanny Price and her clergyman love, Edmund Bertram. But what pushes Fanny and Edmund’s moral and sensible personas to the forefront? The supporting characters present a cavalcade… more goodness …

Happy Valentine’s Day + Giveaway! +

Happy Valentine’s Day + Giveaway! +

Hello Everyone! Happy Valentine’s Day! That’s right, it’s Valentine’s Day. A day all about romance and love, which means you’re in the perfect place. To me, romance goes hand in hand with poetry. So, here is my favorite romantic poem. (At least, to me it’s romantic. I’ve heard other interpretations, but I like my romantic… more goodness …

Setting and Social Status in Austen’s Novels

Setting and Social Status in Austen’s Novels

We all are aware that Austen wrote what she knew. Most authors do, except perchance those who write paranormal or science fiction or fantasy (although I would argue that these made-up worlds have similarities to the present day) and to an extent, historical fiction, but even with historical fiction, I often include something that occurred… more goodness …

The Foils of Jane Austen – Part I

The question of why we love Jane Austen so much has been pondered by many a scholar and reader over the past 200 years.   But if you ask ten people this question, you will surely get ten different answers. Some would say the plots are what they like best.  Others read and admire Austen for… more goodness …

Was Jane Austen (Gasp!) Wrong About Entails?

Was Jane Austen (Gasp!) Wrong About Entails?

There are certain historical inaccuracies which often pop up in Pride and Prejudice variations which catch my eye when I come across them, mostly because I tend to find them annoying. No one is perfect—I certainly do not get everything right. But with the awesome power of the internet, we, as authors, should be able… more goodness …

New Year’s Eve, First-Footing and The Tradition of Singing “Auld Lang Syne”

New Year’s Eve, First-Footing and The Tradition of Singing “Auld Lang Syne”

  New Year’s Day was not always celebrated on January 1. In the time of the Anglo-Saxons, December 25 was the first day of the new year. The Gregorian calendar set December 31 as the last day of the year, but that did not keep people throughout history from celebrating March 1, March 25, and… more goodness …