Category Archives: History

Top Ten Goofs in Emma (1972)

Top Ten Goofs in Emma (1972)

Years ago, I purchased a collection of Austen adaptations produced by the BBC in the 1970’s and 80’s. I watched all of them at least once, but some collected dust after their initial viewing, including this version of Emma. I came to this particular series “cold,” having not watched it clear through in nearly a… more goodness …

Jane Austen’s Writing Desk

Jane Austen’s Writing Desk

I thought for a long time about what I should say in this month’s post.  After a few hours of race-watching (it was a postponed race, so I was watching on Monday instead of Sunday) and bouncing several ideas around in my mind, I decided to go with something writing-related. Suddenly, I thought about our… more goodness …

Freud and Writing Austenesque Fiction

Freud and Writing Austenesque Fiction

Consider any of the Canonical books. Miss Austen does not always offer much data about the social environment present in the Regency. She rarely addresses the great questions of the day: with the exception of offering evidence that Tom Bertram’s time in the West Indies left him scarred and damaged. (I have always chosen to… more goodness …

The Rame Peninsula, One of the Settings for “Where There’s a FitzWILLiam Darcy, There’s a Way” + Giveaway

The Rame Peninsula, One of the Settings for “Where There’s a FitzWILLiam Darcy, There’s a Way” + Giveaway

In writing Where There’s a FitzWILLiam Darcy, There’s a Way, I wanted the Bennet ladies to end up in an area more remote than Hertfordshire after the death of Mr. Bennet—to be out of their element. I wanted them not to be close to either Bingley or Darcy—to be in a place where they would… more goodness …

Sickness and Ill-health in Jane Austen’s Novels (I)

Sickness and Ill-health in Jane Austen’s Novels (I)

Regency society was obsessed with infirmity. Letters from the period are peppered with references to health or the lack thereof, a worry shared by much of the population. In a world with no antibiotics and no real notion of sterilisation or basic hygiene, the most minor concussions, cuts and colds had the potential to take… more goodness …

Balancing Historical Figures and the Story

Balancing Historical Figures and the Story

Recent posts have been about the best way to use history in historical fiction. The goal is to use as much history as possible without burying the story in unnecessary details or derailing the story with unnecessary asides. You want to have history support your story. You don’t want the story to become just travelogue… more goodness …

Rise of the Milliner in England: A History of Mad Hatters, by Sharon Lathan

Rise of the Milliner in England: A History of Mad Hatters, by Sharon Lathan

In case you haven’t heard, I have branched out in my passion for all things Regency into the field of millinery. I’ll share more information and links on that venture at the end of this blog post. Interestingly, as extensively as I have researched aspects of the period in order to write my novels as… more goodness …

Georgiana Darcy’s Near Miss

Georgiana Darcy’s Near Miss

One of the most significant events in Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice is one which happens before the story starts, and one of which we only hear about after the fact: the aborted elopement of Georgiana Darcy with George Wickham. I would assert that this episode is the single largest factor in helping Elizabeth overcome… more goodness …