Top 10 Goofs in Mansfield Park (2007)

Top 10 Goofs in Mansfield Park (2007)

Prior to writing this post, I had only watched this version of Mansfield Park one time, about a decade ago on my local public television station.  Frankly, I haven’t felt compelled to revisit it up to now. With the vague recollection that I hadn’t been particularly impressed, I dove in, trying to keep an open… more goodness …

Jane Fairfax – so much more intriguing than Emma Woodhouse

Jane Fairfax – so much more intriguing than Emma Woodhouse

‘Emma’ has always been my favourite Jane Austen novel. I studied it in detail at school and then again at University. Imagine if ‘Persuasion’ has been on the syllabus? My Highbury Trilogy would never have been written! In it I have explored the more minor characters who have always intrigued me; Mrs Bates, her two… more goodness …

Freebies and Bargain Reads: Entertain Yourself During Quarantine!

Freebies and Bargain Reads: Entertain Yourself During Quarantine!

The world’s a tough place at the moment, and keeping ourselves entertained while in quarantine, isolation, extreme social distancing or (heaven forbid) while in a sickbed is pretty challenging. So I’m doing my part for all JAFF lovers: I’m making The Best of Relations and Mr. Bingley’s Bride free until March 30th, and Infamous Relations… more goodness …

I Won’t Dance, Don’t Ask Me ~ Using “Dance” as a Plot Device in Jane Austen’s Novels

I Won’t Dance, Don’t Ask Me ~ Using “Dance” as a Plot Device in Jane Austen’s Novels

“To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love.” (Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 3) During Austen’s time, young people looked for a potential mate at dances. Austen, herself, enjoyed a good dance, and, therefore, she often used dance as part of her plot line. In a 1798 letter to her sister Cassandra,… more goodness …

Celebrating the Release of “Courting Lord Whitmire” + the Coldstream Toll House + a Giveaway

Celebrating the Release of “Courting Lord Whitmire” + the Coldstream Toll House + a Giveaway

In many tales of the Regency era, we hear of a couple racing to Gretna Green in Scotland to marry before being caught by the lady’s relations. At the time, marrying in Scotland was as simple as standing up before witnesses and sharing one’s desire to be wed to one’s significant other. No calling of… more goodness …