Welcome to The Writers’ Block by Austen Authors!

TheWritersBlockBadgeThe Writers’ Block Forum consists of two unique boards to enhance the Austen Authors website experience for our readers.

Austen Novel Read Along is the board for our ongoing discussion of a Jane Austen novel. Beginning with Lady Susan, new portions of the original text are posted every Wednesday. This is a Discussion board with comments welcome and encouraged! No registration is required to join the discussion.

Jane Austen’s Reading Salon is the board where we freely showcase our writing: short stories, excerpts, deleted scenes, poetry, and other assorted samples, both Austenesque and beyond Austen’s world. This is a “read-only” board. Read to your heart’s content and check back periodically for new posts.

A A A

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_MemberList Members

Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters – maximum search word length is 84 characters

sp_Feed Topic RSS Readalong-Emma-forum-icon
Emma Chapter 13, 14 & 15
Emma Volume I, Chapters XIII, XIV, and XV: Quotes, Questions, and Conversation
August 15, 2016
11:47 PM
Avatar
Moderator
Austen Authors
Forum Posts: 23
Member Since:
December 27, 2014
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Chapter Thirteen begins with some sad news for Emma. Harriet has gotten a bad cold and won’t be able to come to the party at the Westons’. Emma visits her, raising her spirits by declaring how disappointed Mr. Elton will be that Harriet is going to miss the party. Later, after leaving Harriet’s bedside, Emma meets Mr. Elton on his way to visit Harriet:

She had not advanced many yards from Mrs. Goddard’s door, when she was met by Mr. Elton himself, evidently coming towards it, and as they walked on slowly together in conversation about the invalid—of whom he, on the rumour of considerable illness, had been going to inquire, that he might carry some report of her to Hartfield—they were overtaken by Mr. John Knightley returning from the daily visit to Donwell, with his two eldest boys, whose healthy, glowing faces shewed all the benefit of a country run, and seemed to ensure a quick despatch of the roast mutton and rice pudding they were hastening home for. They joined company and proceeded together. Emma was just describing the nature of her friend’s complaint;—”a throat very much inflamed, with a great deal of heat about her, a quick, low pulse, &c. and she was sorry to find from Mrs. Goddard that Harriet was liable to very bad sore-throats, and had often alarmed her with them.” Mr. Elton looked all alarm on the occasion, as he exclaimed,

“A sore-throat!—I hope not infectious. I hope not of a putrid infectious sort. Has Perry seen her? Indeed you should take care of yourself as well as of your friend. Let me entreat you to run no risks. Why does not Perry see her?”

Emma, knowing how disappointed Mr. Elton must be about Harriet’s illness,  provided him with a ready excuse for not going to the party–the weather will be too cold and snowy for walking.

But hardly had she so spoken, when she found her brother was civilly offering a seat in his carriage, if the weather were Mr. Elton’s only objection, and Mr. Elton actually accepting the offer with much prompt satisfaction. It was a done thing; Mr. Elton was to go, and never had his broad handsome face expressed more pleasure than at this moment; never had his smile been stronger, nor his eyes more exulting than when he next looked at her.

This confuses Emma a bit, but she figures that being a bachelor, Mr. Elton is lonely for company and dinners out. Her brother-in-law, John Knightley, offers a different explanation: 

“Yes,” said Mr. John Knightley presently, with some slyness, “he seems to have a great deal of good-will towards you.”

“Me!” she replied with a smile of astonishment, “are you imagining me to be Mr. Elton’s object?”

“Such an imagination has crossed me, I own, Emma; and if it never occurred to you before, you may as well take it into consideration now.”

“Mr. Elton in love with me!—What an idea!”

“I do not say it is so; but you will do well to consider whether it is so or not, and to regulate your behaviour accordingly. I think your manners to him encouraging. I speak as a friend, Emma. You had better look about you, and ascertain what you do, and what you mean to do.”

Emma is sure John is wrong, but later on, when they pick up Mr. Elton in the carriage, he is much too cheerful, considering Harriet’s illness. She tries to distance herself from him at the party, but finds that he is constantly at her side:

Emma’s project of forgetting Mr. Elton for a while made her rather sorry to find, when they had all taken their places, that he was close to her. The difficulty was great of driving his strange insensibility towards Harriet, from her mind, while he not only sat at her elbow, but was continually obtruding his happy countenance on her notice, and solicitously addressing her upon every occasion. Instead of forgetting him, his behaviour was such that she could not avoid the internal suggestion of “Can it really be as my brother imagined? can it be possible for this man to be beginning to transfer his affections from Harriet to me?—Absurd and insufferable!”

Mr. Elton’s attention became particularly irritating to Emma when the Westons’ began to discuss some news about Frank Churchill. Emma could not hear the news because Mr. Elton kept talking to her.

Now, it so happened that in spite of Emma’s resolution of never marrying, there was something in the name, in the idea of Mr. Frank Churchill, which always interested her. She had frequently thought—especially since his father’s marriage with Miss Taylor—that if she were to marry, he was the very person to suit her in age, character and condition. He seemed by this connexion between the families, quite to belong to her. She could not but suppose it to be a match that every body who knew them must think of. That Mr. and Mrs. Weston did think of it, she was very strongly persuaded; and though not meaning to be induced by him, or by any body else, to give up a situation which she believed more replete with good than any she could change it for, she had a great curiosity to see him, a decided intention of finding him pleasant, of being liked by him to a certain degree, and a sort of pleasure in the idea of their being coupled in their friends’ imaginations.

Later on, however, Mr. Elton told her that Frank would most likely be coming for a visit. His visit is not absolutely certain, as Mr. Weston explains:

Frank’s coming depends upon their being put off. If they are not put off, he cannot stir. But I know they will, because it is a family that a certain lady, of some consequence, at Enscombe, has a particular dislike to: and though it is thought necessary to invite them once in two or three years, they always are put off when it comes to the point. I have not the smallest doubt of the issue.

This little tidbit brings me to my first question:

1. What do you think of the Churchill’s practice of inviting their acquaintances to come visit and then cancelling out on them? Do you think this might foreshadow something about Frank’s nature?

Emma and Mrs. Weston blame Mrs. Churchill for Frank’s strange behavior. As Mrs. Weston states:

Enscombe, I believe, certainly must not be judged by general rules: she is so very unreasonable; and every thing gives way to her.

At about this time, John Knightley declares that the ground is covered in snow. Panic ensues until Mr. Knightley goes out to examine the road himself and declares that they should have no trouble getting home. However, the damage has been done, and Mr. Woodhouse decides to go home right away with his family. But, unfortunately, John forgets that he is supposed to be in the carriage with Emma and Mr. Elton. He goes in the other carriage, leaving Emma and Mr. Elton alone:

Emma found, on being escorted and followed into the second carriage by Mr. Elton, that the door was to be lawfully shut on them, and that they were to have a tete-a-tete drive. It would not have been the awkwardness of a moment, it would have been rather a pleasure, previous to the suspicions of this very day; she could have talked to him of Harriet, and the three-quarters of a mile would have seemed but one. But now, she would rather it had not happened. She believed he had been drinking too much of Mr. Weston’s good wine, and felt sure that he would want to be talking nonsense.

To restrain him as much as might be, by her own manners, she was immediately preparing to speak with exquisite calmness and gravity of the weather and the night; but scarcely had she begun, scarcely had they passed the sweep-gate and joined the other carriage, than she found her subject cut up—her hand seized—her attention demanded, and Mr. Elton actually making violent love to her: availing himself of the precious opportunity, declaring sentiments which must be already well known, hoping—fearing—adoring—ready to die if she refused him; but flattering himself that his ardent attachment and unequalled love and unexampled passion could not fail of having some effect, and in short, very much resolved on being seriously accepted as soon as possible. It really was so. Without scruple—without apology—without much apparent diffidence, Mr. Elton, the lover of Harriet, was professing himself her lover. She tried to stop him; but vainly; he would go on, and say it all. Angry as she was, the thought of the moment made her resolve to restrain herself when she did speak. She felt that half this folly must be drunkenness, and therefore could hope that it might belong only to the passing hour. Accordingly, with a mixture of the serious and the playful, which she hoped would best suit his half and half state, she replied,

“I am very much astonished, Mr. Elton. This to me! you forget yourself—you take me for my friend—any message to Miss Smith I shall be happy to deliver; but no more of this to me, if you please.”

“Miss Smith!—message to Miss Smith!—What could she possibly mean!”—And he repeated her words with such assurance of accent, such boastful pretence of amazement, that she could not help replying with quickness,

“Mr. Elton, this is the most extraordinary conduct! and I can account for it only in one way; you are not yourself, or you could not speak either to me, or of Harriet, in such a manner. Command yourself enough to say no more, and I will endeavour to forget it.”

But Mr. Elton had only drunk wine enough to elevate his spirits, not at all to confuse his intellects. He perfectly knew his own meaning; and having warmly protested against her suspicion as most injurious, and slightly touched upon his respect for Miss Smith as her friend,—but acknowledging his wonder that Miss Smith should be mentioned at all,—he resumed the subject of his own passion, and was very urgent for a favourable answer.

As she thought less of his inebriety, she thought more of his inconstancy and presumption; and with fewer struggles for politeness, replied,

“It is impossible for me to doubt any longer. You have made yourself too clear. Mr. Elton, my astonishment is much beyond any thing I can express. After such behaviour, as I have witnessed during the last month, to Miss Smith—such attentions as I have been in the daily habit of observing—to be addressing me in this manner—this is an unsteadiness of character, indeed, which I had not supposed possible! Believe me, sir, I am far, very far, from gratified in being the object of such professions.”

“Good Heaven!” cried Mr. Elton, “what can be the meaning of this?—Miss Smith!—I never thought of Miss Smith in the whole course of my existence—never paid her any attentions, but as your friend: never cared whether she were dead or alive, but as your friend. If she has fancied otherwise, her own wishes have misled her, and I am very sorry—extremely sorry—But, Miss Smith, indeed!—Oh! Miss Woodhouse! who can think of Miss Smith, when Miss Woodhouse is near! No, upon my honour, there is no unsteadiness of character. I have thought only of you. I protest against having paid the smallest attention to any one else. Every thing that I have said or done, for many weeks past, has been with the sole view of marking my adoration of yourself. You cannot really, seriously, doubt it. No!—(in an accent meant to be insinuating)—I am sure you have seen and understood me.”

It would be impossible to say what Emma felt, on hearing this—which of all her unpleasant sensations was uppermost. She was too completely overpowered to be immediately able to reply: and two moments of silence being ample encouragement for Mr. Elton’s sanguine state of mind, he tried to take her hand again, as he joyously exclaimed—

“Charming Miss Woodhouse! allow me to interpret this interesting silence. It confesses that you have long understood me.”

“No, sir,” cried Emma, “it confesses no such thing. So far from having long understood you, I have been in a most complete error with respect to your views, till this moment. As to myself, I am very sorry that you should have been giving way to any feelings—Nothing could be farther from my wishes—your attachment to my friend Harriet—your pursuit of her, (pursuit, it appeared,) gave me great pleasure, and I have been very earnestly wishing you success: but had I supposed that she were not your attraction to Hartfield, I should certainly have thought you judged ill in making your visits so frequent. Am I to believe that you have never sought to recommend yourself particularly to Miss Smith?—that you have never thought seriously of her?”

“Never, madam,” cried he, affronted in his turn: “never, I assure you. I think seriously of Miss Smith!—Miss Smith is a very good sort of girl; and I should be happy to see her respectably settled. I wish her extremely well: and, no doubt, there are men who might not object to—Every body has their level: but as for myself, I am not, I think, quite so much at a loss. I need not so totally despair of an equal alliance, as to be addressing myself to Miss Smith!—No, madam, my visits to Hartfield have been for yourself only; and the encouragement I received—”

“Encouragement!—I give you encouragement!—Sir, you have been entirely mistaken in supposing it. I have seen you only as the admirer of my friend. In no other light could you have been more to me than a common acquaintance. I am exceedingly sorry: but it is well that the mistake ends where it does. Had the same behaviour continued, Miss Smith might have been led into a misconception of your views; not being aware, probably, any more than myself, of the very great inequality which you are so sensible of. But, as it is, the disappointment is single, and, I trust, will not be lasting. I have no thoughts of matrimony at present.”

He was too angry to say another word; her manner too decided to invite supplication; and in this state of swelling resentment, and mutually deep mortification, they had to continue together a few minutes longer, for the fears of Mr. Woodhouse had confined them to a foot-pace. If there had not been so much anger, there would have been desperate awkwardness; but their straightforward emotions left no room for the little zigzags of embarrassment. Without knowing when the carriage turned into Vicarage Lane, or when it stopped, they found themselves, all at once, at the door of his house; and he was out before another syllable passed.—Emma then felt it indispensable to wish him a good night. The compliment was just returned, coldly and proudly; and, under indescribable irritation of spirits, she was then conveyed to Hartfield.

The next two questions concern this passage:

2. Emma has spent a lot of time trying to get Harriet and Mr. Elton alone together. How did she do this in previous chapters? Now, she has been shut up in a carriage with Mr. Elton. What are the rules for two people of the opposite gender being alone together? When would it be acceptable and when would they need a chaperone?

3. Do you think that Mr. Elton is at all at fault for the misunderstanding between himself and Emma? Admittedly, her pride has blinded her to his attraction, but has his pride also blinded him to the notion that Emma might be encouraging him to like her friend?

August 17, 2016
1:15 PM
Avatar
Leenie
Guest
Guests

I must admit to not feeling the best today, so though I wish to comment on the read along passage, my answers will be short and not particularly deep and not even answers really. 🙂  I did enjoy this section of the text. 

1.  That is an interesting character connection between the Churchills and Frank.  I had not thought of that and am delighted to be able to view things with this thought in mind. Not that I have had enough time to ponder and put my thoughts into words 🙂  

2. My thought on that situation was — If this had been Lizzy and Mr. Collins who had gotten locked in that carriage together…alone, I wonder what Mrs. Bennet would do?  

3. I think both are at fault in the situation. Both were looking at what they wished to accomplish and interpreting things through their wishes. 

Sorry, I know my comments are not deep or profound or anything along that line, but all my poor brain can manage at the moment.  🙂

August 18, 2016
1:33 AM
Avatar
Moderator
Austen Authors
Forum Posts: 70
Member Since:
December 27, 2014
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

SOOOO late to the party this week. Sorry!

1. I wish we saw the Churchill’s first hand. Maybe Austen thought a Mrs. Elton and a Mrs. Churchill was too much for one novel? She is awful, and this passage betrays that. The end of the book makes Mr. Churchill out to be a bit nicer, but he must have lived completely as his wife’s beck and call.  The only thing remotely nice she does is adopt Frank, and even then she insults his fathers. Still, I’d like to meet her …

2. John Knightley screwed up here. Emma should not have been left alone with Mr. Elton, but as he is the rector and a close friend, it’s not the worse transgression. It just puts Emma in a very bad position. John’s observations on Mr. Elton’s preference for Emma makes his neglect worse.

As for Leenie’s thought – Mrs. Bennet would have held the coach door shut on them, unless she had a better suitor in mind …

3. I think you nailed it Leenie. Both Emma and Elton have been blinded by pride and vanity to reality. They are juts like two sides of the same coin in this scene, and their mutual mortification is one of my favorite parts of this book.